Saint Sinnerman
Perhaps men of genius are the only true men. In all the history of the race there have been only a few thousand real men. And the rest of us—what are we? Teachable animals. Without the help of the real man, we should have found out almost nothing at all. Almost all the ideas with which we are familiar could never have occurred to minds like ours. Plant the seeds there and they will grow; but our minds could never spontaneously have generated them
Aldous Huxley (via growthofthesoil)
boblovesembig:

eroticbi:

6

Perla

djelevatedpoet:

Injustice anywhere…

Fatalistic act

Possibilities of a “dream”

Occurs like a blood moon

Laying hallowed on an balcony with a bullet hole the size of lost hope

Amongst the darkened skies

Something “I” thought was capable to “have”

Conveys a nightmare beyond reach

Filled with broken promises…

kalakutajournals:

Black Consciousness

kalakutajournals:

Black Consciousness

thaeversotalentedmrg:

"For 40 years, the U.S. Public Health Service has conducted a study in which human guinea pigs, not given proper treatment, have died of syphilis and its side effects," Associated Press reporter Jean Heller wrote on July 25, 1972. "The study was conducted to determine from autopsies what the…

scienceyoucanlove:

Studies show ‘dark chapter’ of medical research

By Elizabeth Landau

(CNN) — The Tuskegee syphilis experiment of the 20th century is often cited as the most famous example of unethical medical research. Now, evidence has emerged that it overlapped with a shorter study, also sponsored by U.S. government health agencies, in which human subjects were unknowingly being harmed by participating in an experiment.

Research from Wellesley College professor Susan Reverby has uncovered evidence of an experiment in Guatemala that infected people with sexually transmitted diseases in an effort to explore treatments.

The U.S. government apologized for the research project on Friday, more than 60 years after the experiments ended. Officials said an investigation will be launched into the matter.

The Tuskegee and the Guatemala studies show what National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins called a “a dark chapter in the history of medicine.”

As unethical as the methods were, the basic research questions behind both studies were highly relevant at the time, said Peter Brown, medical anthropologist at Emory University. Research in Guatemala focused on the powers of penicillin; in Tuskegee, researchers wanted to know the natural history of syphilis.

"In a racist context, they thought [syphilis] might be different in African-Americans; the real unethical part in my mind had to do with denial of treatment and, most importantly, the denial of information about the study to the men involved," he said.

In 1926, syphilis was seen as a major health problem, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; in 1928, about 25 percent of black employees at the Delta Pine and Land Company of Mississippi had tested positive for syphilis, according to Tuskegee University. A charity called the Julius Rosenwald Fund came to the U.S. Public Health Service to start a project to improve the health of African-Americans in the South.

But in 1929, the Great Depression began, and the Rosenwald Fund had to cut its funds for the treatment program.

The director of the U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. Taliaferro Clark, proposed salvaging the project by investigating the course of untreated syphilis.

Getting African-Americans to participate was not a challenge; most African-Americans did not have access to medical care at that time and the study provided free health exams, food and transportation, according to Tuskegee University.

But none of the patients who had syphilis was told that he carried the condition, and doctors did not give the patients sufficient treatment. Instead they were told they would get treatment for “bad blood,” a phrase that connoted a variety of illnesses including syphilis, anemia and fatigue, the CDC said.

The Tuskegee study, which began in the early 1930s, consisted of 399 African-American men with syphilis and 201 without, according to the CDC. The Tuskegee Institute partnered with the Public Health Service for an experiment that was supposed to last 6 months. Instead it lasted about 40 years.

While the Tuskegee study was still going in the 1940s, other efforts that would never meet today’s medical ethics standards were going on elsewhere. The Public Health Service did research at a U.S. prison in 1944 that involved injecting inmates with gonorrhea, Reverby said. That project was abandoned, and the Public Health Service turned to Guatemala to more closely examine syphilis and in what ways penicillin could treat or prevent it, Reverby said in documents posted on her website.

"The whole fact that the Public Health Service was very aware about the ethical problems is very characteristic of American international health policy at the time, which was very condescending to other countries," Brown said.

It turns out that a physician at the Public Health Service, Dr. John C. Cutler, participated in both the Guatemala and the Tuskegee experiments. Cutler came to the Tuskegee project in the 1960s, according to Reverby, and continued to defend it even in the 1990s, long after it ended. Cutler died in 2003 at age 87.

The Guatemala syphilis research involved 696 subjects who came from the Guatemala National Penitentiary, army barracks and the National Mental Health Hospital, according to Reverby’s research. These subjects did not give direct permission to participate. Instead, the authorities signed them up. There were also 772 patients exposed to gonorrhea and 142 subjects exposed to chancres, according to a CDC report.

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newwavefeminism:

2brwngrls:

eshusplayground:

wise-barrel-maker:

Based on this list See Sources below for more info. View pictures fullscreen to see captions

30 Days 21 Hunger Games Argo Drive Pay it Forward Lone Ranger Fantastic 4

Lemme reblog again and let you know why casting that white woman as the female lead in “Drive” was so fucking wrong and fucked up.

Director Nicolas Winding Refn literally gave Carey Mulligan the part because she “seemed pure,” like someone he wanted to protect.

No, really. He literally said that shit.

These traits were ones he literally did not consider a Latina for. He picked her specifically because he fit that damsel in distress imagine that’s been coded as white. Latinas were not even given the opportunity to audition for the role.

AND SCENE

Let me post this again so people can see how we continuously allow (require?) movies to whitewash and erase POC out of media/our consciousness

malcolmxvideos:

Malcolm X: I Don’t Believe in Any Kind of Nonviolence

honorable-martin:

Storm/Ororo


• Marvel Comics art

danteklitbo:

http://danteklitbo.tumblr.com/
"Brazilian Psycho" - (Juliana Salimeni) 
"Dont F*ck With Ju Ju"

danteklitbo:

http://danteklitbo.tumblr.com/

"Brazilian Psycho" - (Juliana Salimeni) 

"Dont F*ck With Ju Ju"

mukeshbalani:

How The iWatch Could Be Apple’s Secret Weapon For Mobile Payments (AAPL)

Apple’s first wearable may be different than other smartwatches and fitness trackers. While gadgets such as the Pebble, Jawbone, the Samsung Gear 2 and others are all about notifications and health tracking, Apple’s iWatch may also target a less sought after area of focus for wearables— mobile payments.

mukeshbalani:

How The iWatch Could Be Apple’s Secret Weapon For Mobile Payments (AAPL)

Apple’s first wearable may be different than other smartwatches and fitness trackers. While gadgets such as the Pebble, Jawbone, the Samsung Gear 2 and others are all about notifications and health tracking, Apple’s iWatch may also target a less sought after area of focus for wearables— mobile payments.